Piggery

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Pigs are farmed principally to be eaten. Almost all of the pig can be used as food. Preparations of pig parts into specialties include: sausage (and casings made from the intestines), bacon, etc. This is also, technically, the case for all other mammals, although the demand isn’t really there.

The way in which a stockperson interacts with pigs affects animal welfare which in some circumstances can correlate with production measures. Many routine interactions can cause fear, which can result in stress and decreased production.

It’s nearly impossible to describe a flavor.

Pork, like just about any other meat, is very different depending on the cut and the preparation. Some lean pork chops, overcooked, can be pretty bland and chewy. When it’s done right, though, pork can taste like choirs of umami-clad angels singing on your tongue. It can have a deep, satisfying flavor with delicious fatty notes along with a tender, juicy texture. And, if you go the crispy bacon route, it becomes the crackling rays of salty heaven smiling down.

It can be, in other words, some of the best meat you’ve ever had.

Mushroom

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Edible mushrooms are consumed for their nutritional value and they are occasionally consumed for their supposed medicinal value. A commonly eaten mushroom is the white mushroom (Agaricus bisporus). In 100 grams, these provide 22 calories and are composed of 92% water, 3% carbohydrates, 3% protein and 0.3% fat. They contain high levels (20% or more of the Daily Value, DV) of riboflavin, niacin, and pantothenic acid (24–33% DV), with lower moderate content of phosphorus.

There are all sorts of different mushrooms in the world. From common edible mushrooms to exotic varieties from the far-east, the earth offers thousands of them. Although they are technically a type of fungus, mushrooms are commonly recognized as a vegetable.

No matter what dietary system you prefer, mushrooms can play a significant role in health.